Two Monsters

June 5, 2016 at 11:34 am | Posted in Crime and punishment | Leave a comment
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Photo in 1887 of the actor Richard Mansfield, by Henry Van der Weyde (1838-1924; London,

Photo in 1887 of the actor Richard Mansfield, by Henry Van der Weyde (1838-1924; London,

A previous posting on this blog tried to make sense of the murderer of a sweet, trusting, in-love teen age girl by a high-achieving college student, who was both a good student and an althlete.

The only picture that seemed plausible at the the time was that the murderer was ordinarily a decent human being, but had been scared into becoming a murderer. His accomplice was hardly discussed in that posting, because she seemed to be a cipher. But it was implicitly assumed that she, too, was ordinarily a decent person, who had been driven by friendship to commit evil.

I was wrong.

A recent article by T. Rees Shapiro, Moriah Balangit in the Washington Post shows that David Eisenhauer and Natalie Keeper were pysochopathic monsters. They each really are both Jekyll and Hyde.

Indeed, the incident that begins the plot line in Robert Louis Stevenson’s novel bears an eerie resemblance to the sequence of events that unfolded from Nicole Lovell’s natural search for romantic love, a search whose natural strength would have been intensified by the self-doubt and desire for vindication that resulted from the ‘mean girl’ bullying she had endured at her middle school.

David Eisenhauer and Natalie Keeper constitute potentially instructive examples of how two people, well-raised in presumably loving families, could become like the SS troopers in Nazi concentration camps, and like the ‘guards’ in the present day concentration camps in North Korea.

We need a detailed understanding of how that happens.

June 4 = Tianenmen Square Day

June 4, 2016 at 10:54 am | Posted in Abuse of Office, Enemies of Freedom, Fairness, Judicial Misjudgment | 2 Comments
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A Chinese Type 59 tank at the Beijing Military Museum. A Type 59 main battle tank on display at the Military Museum of the Chinese People's Revolution in western Beijing. On June 3, 1989, People's Liberation Army soldiers on Type 59 tanks began firing on civilian demonstrators at Muxidi near the military museum. (Wikipedia) Photo by Max Smith.

A Chinese Type 59 tank at the Beijing Military Museum. A Type 59 main battle tank on display at the Military Museum of the Chinese People’s Revolution in western Beijing. On June 3, 1989, People’s Liberation Army soldiers on Type 59 tanks began firing on civilian demonstrators at Muxidi near the military museum.
(Wikipedia) Photo by Max Smith.

Today is June 4 – Tiananmen Square Day.

It is a day to honor the love of freedom, the desire for the rule of law, the insistence on fairness, and the true patriotism of the students and others who demonstrated in Tianenmen Square in Beijing, and in other cities, throughout May and early June of 1989.

It is a day to honor the bravery and patriotism of Tank Man.

They were not a threat to China. But China’s self-appointed rulers felt the student’s ideas to be a threat to their rule. So the self-appointed rulers crushed the demonstrations, and sometimes literally crushed demonstrators, with ostentatious cruelty.

For more background, see these previous posts on this blog: here, here, and here.

The student’s chose black as the color to symbolize agreement with their goals.

To honor them and their goals, wear something black today.

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