Morsi and Putin

July 24, 2013 at 7:17 pm | Posted in Abuse of Office, Conceited, Enemies of Freedom | Leave a comment
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Mohamed Morsi, photographed at on May 8, 2013 by Wilson Dias for Agência Brasil, during Morsi's reception by President Dilma Rousseff, of Brazil. The original image has been turned upside down.

Mohamed Morsi, photographed at on May 8, 2013 by Wilson Dias for Agência Brasil, during Morsi’s reception by President Dilma Rousseff, of Brazil.
The original image has been turned upside down.

Before he was overthrown, the former President of Egypt, Morsi
– “temporarily granted himself unlimited powers to “protect” the nation in late November 2012″
– granted himself “the power to legislate without judicial oversight or review of his acts”
– rammed through changes to the Constitution that would favor himself and his former party, which represented the Islamic Brotherhood.
(The quotes are from an article in Wikipedia.)

Morsi’s overthrow was not undemocratic.  His overthrow did not undermine the rule of law.  It was not a coup: Morsi’s acts were the coup.
In the long run, if Eygpt’s military lives up to its promises, Morsi’s overthrow will have protected the rule of law.

Overthrowing Morsi was just and necessary, because Morsi was acting more and more like Putin.

Official portrait of Vladimir Putin (2006). This file comes from the website of the President of the Russian Federation and is copyrighted.

Official portrait of Vladimir Putin (2006). This file comes from the website of the President of the Russian Federation and is copyrighted.

 

An Historic Opportunity for Egypt’s Military

July 8, 2013 at 1:54 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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Mohamed Morsi, photographed at on May 8, 2013 by Wilson Dias for Agência Brasil, during Morsi's reception by President Dilma Rousseff, of Brazil. The original image has been turned upside down.

Mohamed Morsi, photographed at on May 8, 2013 by Wilson Dias for Agência Brasil, during Morsi’s reception by President Dilma Rousseff, of Brazil.
The original image has been turned upside down.

Until this week, Egypt’s military seemed fated to appear in the history books as being blind to the benefits of democracy and of an open society, and as interested only in its own welfare and power.

Its removal of the undemocratic, autocratic, coercive Morsi regime and the Islamic Brotherhood from power suddenly offers the prospect that Egypt’s military can now end up being recognized as truly patriotic, as the friend and defender of democracy and of an open society, and therefore as the defender of the true interests of Egypt.

Although Morsi and the Islamicists were elected, they were elected because the majority that opposes their policies did not understand what was at stake in the election, nor the need for political organization.  Many did not vote.  The secularist opposition was fragmented.  This is well described in an article by Abigail Hauslohner in the Washington Post.

That was because during that election, democracy was new to Egypt.  The results of the election were not the results of a functioning democracy.  The overthrow of Morsi and the Islamicists was not an assault on democracy.  Jack H. G. Darrant, whose blog The Political Idealist is noted for its rigorous analyses, came to the same conclusion.

Egypt has learned a lot as a result of seeing Morsi and the Islamicists in action.  Morsi and the Islamicists do not understand and value democracy and an open society, do not want to understand, and never will understand.  They are autocrats at heart.

Egypt’s military has given Egypt a new chance to build a thriving, open society.

Why Gaza Now?

November 20, 2012 at 6:24 pm | Posted in Enemies of Freedom | 1 Comment
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Map of Gaza Strip, Stand December 2008 (SVG version of File:Gaza Strip map.png by Lencer, adapted by Gringer)

Map of Gaza Strip, Stand December 2008 (SVG version of File:Gaza Strip map.png by Lencer, adapted by Gringer)

Why Gaza Now?

The timing is suspicious.

Israel had done nothing new to provoke Hamas.

Yet suddenly Hamas started firing rockets into Israel.  Hamas seems to be asking for a violent defensive reaction by Israel.

Why Gaza now?

Here is a guess: the primary instigators reside well north of Gaza.

Very large demonstration in Homs, Syria against Al Assad regime in the Syrian Uprising, 18 April 2011, photgraphed by Bo Yaser.

Very large demonstration in Homs, Syria against Al Assad regime in the Syrian Uprising, 18 April 2011, photgraphed by Bo Yaser.

The civil war in Syria has stressed Hezbollah and Iran, as well as Syria.  Hezbollah has developed a split between those within it who side with Assad and those within it who side with the rebellion.  Also, because Hezbollah had previously wholeheartedly sided with Assad, it has lost the support of large parts of the public in Lebanon, as well as elsewhere in the Arab world.  For the same reason, Iran has lost a lot of outside sympathy.

So the guess is that Hezbollah and Iran told Hamas to heat things up.

The goal was to divert attention away from Syria, Iran, and Lebanon, by drawing the world’s gaze towards Gaza and Israel.

The goal was also to reunite Hezbollah, by re-focusing on its traditional enemy.  The hope was also to thereby win back for Hezbollah some of the support of  the Lebanese public.

Evidence for this guess is contained in a headline to an article by Annne Gearan on page A9 in the November 20, 2012 print edition of the Washington Post: “Israel-Hamas fighting put U.S. at odds with Turkey, Egypt”.  (That was the headline in the print edition.  The headline in the online edition always differs from that in the print edition.)

Russia and China, too, must be delighted by the sucess of this new ploy.

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